Catalogue des cours licence de relations internationales

Catalogue de cours Licence Relations Internationales

Advanced International Relations Theory

The course explores a range of contemporary
research programs and debates in International Relations (IR), from rationalist
theories of war and nuclear proliferation through constructivist studies of norms
and anxiety to debates on the legalization of world politics and the critique
of IR as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Students will gain a more profound
understanding of key disciplinary debates, middle-range theories, and research strategies.
They will read original articles of IR theory on a weekly basis, engage in class
discussions to defend or challenge particular approaches, and write a discussion
paper critically comparing the different theories.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : J. Grzybowski | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


American Politics and Political Institutions: Continuity and Change (en ligne)

Contenu bientôt disponible

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : English | Enseignant : K. Long | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Area Studies: African Politics*

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with politics and political power in Africa, in its theoretical and empirical aspects.
Although the colonial period has profoundly impacted African governance and institutions, and former colonial powers have clearly shown intent and ability to to manipulate events on the continent, African leaders at national and regional levels do strive to build pluralistic institutions, forge democratic processes, and take on the biggest challenge of all: bring together diverse, numerous and sometimes mutually hostile ethnic groups and build nations.
Discussions on key issues will deal with: the necessary ingredients which foster state and nation building; democracy, accountability and violence; how and why does political legitimacy relate to ethnicity? to what extent does democracy foster development? why does the abundance of natural resources in some areas seem to impede the provision of basic public goods and services?

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Tevoedjre | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Area Studies: Caucasus*

Course objectives:
– Understand some of the underlying dynamics of the conflicts that have taken place in the South and North Caucasus since the late 1980s.
– Learning to analyse current events in historical perspective.
– Becoming familiar with ongoing tensions in a “European neighbourhood”.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : G. Prelz Oltramonti | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Area Studies: East Asia*

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Véron | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Area Studies: Middle East

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : T. Richard | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Area Studies: South Asia*

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : I. Sankey | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Atelier de lecture et d’expression: littérature et politique

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : A. Laumier | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Borders, Boundaries, and Migration

This course offers an introduction to the study of borders, boundaries and migration. We will explore how the governance of migration and borders has been transformed to include a diverse range of actors away from the exclusive domain of the state. Increasingly, EU agencies, IGOs, NGOs, security professionals and religious organisations have become key players in governing mobilities. Key rationalities underpinning this governance will be explored, from managerial, to security, and humanitarian. Emerging practices for migration control often defy a territorial logic to borders, instead taking place in so-called transit and sending countries or in virtual spaces through surveillance and technology mechanisms. Thus, far from disappearing, as some scholars of globalization maintain, borders are emerging in new spaces both inside and outside the territorial state. This leads us to question the location of borders, their constitution, and their effects on liberties and fundamental rights. The course will provide students with the knowledge and concepts to think critically about how power works through borders and with what effects on states, populations and individuals in terms of their inclusion/exclusion, freedom, and mobility.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Fine | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Comparative Politics

This course provides the analytical knowledge and practical skills to understand comparative politics worldwide. It addresses a wide range of issues such as: What are the key features of democracies and autocracies and how can regimes best be classified? How can democratic backsliding be prevented in the European Union and worldwide? How did nation state emerge and what is their role in an age of globalization? What are the effects of different electoral systems? How did parties and party system change over the past decades and why? Is political participation declining or just changing? The course covers these questions and many others by utilizing the methods and techniques of comparative politics. You will learn about states and regimes worldwide – as well as deepening your understanding of your own society. In short, this course will provide invaluable skills and knowledge for anyone seeking to develop familiarity with the major issues in comparative politics and the practical skills in analysing countries around the globe.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : F.-C. von Nostitz | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Diplomacy, Negotiation, Mediation

This course provides an introduction to diplomacy, mediation and negotiation in the 21st Century. We follow two key premises: firstly, we emphasize the agentic role of diplomacy in making world politics – far from simply a way in which states talk to one another, diplomatic practices shape international relations, from international law, security, humanitarianism, to health, and migration. Our second premise is that many conflicts and crises can be settled without a violent clash (sanctions, interruption of diplomatic commerce or even resort to arms) if actors employ appropriate diplomatic methods. Thus, we examine how the mix of deterrence, reassurance, confidence building, material rewards, punishments and recognition strongly impact on the settlement of a dispute. Students will be encouraged to put themselves in the shoes of diplomats in the cases discussed in order to encourage the development of skills for successful negotiation.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : 30% TD (to be defined), 20% policy paper and 50% final exam. | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Fine | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Economie politique

Le cours vise d’abord à fournir une introduction à l’économie politique et à ses courants principaux selon une approche historique et épistémologique. L’enseignement ambitionne également de développer chez les étudiant.e.s une capacité d’analyse critique à même de leur permettre de s’emparer, d’interroger et de comprendre les enjeux politiques majeurs des théories économiques. Le cours, intitulé « La valeur des choses, la valeur de chacun », retracera l’histoire de la pensée économique en suivant le fil rouge des théories de la valeur et des réponses à des questions à l’apparence banales comme : qu’est-ce que la valeur ? Comment est-elle produite ? Quelles sont les activités productrices de valeur, et, par conséquent, quels sont les sujets qui produisent la valeur ?
La notion de valeur sera traitée comme une « notion-charnière » faisant passer sans cesse l’économique dans le politique, et le politique dans l’économique. A côté de la notion de valeur, en parallèle, nous aborderons aussi la question de cette institution qui se charge depuis la naissance du capitalisme industriel de la production de la valeur économique, c’est-à-dire l’entreprise – avec un regard historique porté sur le management et les sciences de gestion en tant que laboratoire théorico-pratique des formes de gouvernement politique des individus. En d’autres termes, le cours sera structuré le long d’une série « économie-valeur-entreprise-management-politique » ; une série qui est susceptible d’être parcourue dans les deux sens, dans un mouvement d’aller et retour.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : max. 40% CC; min. 60 % examen final | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : M. Nicoli | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Environment, Resources, and Food

Natural resources are fundamental to the functioning of our economy and society: land and water, fossil fuels, minerals and metals, air and biodiversity are crucial to the production of food and of primary commodities, besides being essential to the reproduction of life on earth.
This introductory course focused on three main themes – environment, resources and food – will guide the students through an analysis of the creation of cheap nature and cheap food in contemporary capitalism. The module is largely shaped as an introduction to critical political ecology, opening to the study of the causes of the current environmental crisis. It requires no prior background.
The module is divided in three parts. The first part presents the theory of commodification of nature and rent extraction as driving the environmental crisis. The second part focuses on the intensification of extraction and consumption of fossil fuels – coal, oil and natural gas – in the last two centuries is the main cause of the process of climate change. The third part connects the production of cheap food in the global food system to the environmental crisis.
By the end of the course students should have achieved:
An understanding of the relation between society and nature through the concepts of commodification, primitive accumulation and financialisation
The ability to analyse the connection between natural resources, capitalism and the environmental crisis
The capacity to connect trends and patterns in the use of resources to trends and patters in the food and fuel systems

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Greco | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Epistémologie des sciences sociales

Le cours vise à fournir une introduction à la réflexion épistémologique concernant les conditions et les modalités de production de savoirs scientifiques, notamment sur des objets sociaux et politiques. En quoi la science politique est-elle une science (sociale) ? Quels rapports de filiation ou d’antagonisme se sont-ils historiquement établis entre les sciences humaines et sociales d’une part, et les sciences de la nature de l’autre ? Quels sont les enjeux politiques et sociaux impliqués par la réflexion épistémologique ? Le cours s’interrogera autour de telles questions, en pratiquant, en tant que fil conducteur des séances, un aller-retour entre science de la politique et politique de la science – ou mieux : politiques des sciences –, ce qui impliquera, en même temps, d’interroger politiquement la question de la production des vérités scientifiques.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); examen terminal de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : M. Nicoli | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


EU External Action

The course will examine the various different aspects of the EU’s external relations – its trade policies, development aid, foreign policy, and security and defence policy. These can include topics such as the politics of EU trade treaties such as CETA and TTIP, the EU approach to international issues such as climate change and migration, the gradual evolution of an EU foreign policy, and the debates over an EU defence dimension. The course will start with an overview of theoretical approaches that can be used to analyse and interpret the EU’s external relations, and will also set out some of the decision-making structures and processes that underpin EU policy-making in these spheres.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC représente de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); Examen final représente de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale OU examen final représente 100 % de la note | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : M. Holmes | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Europe et l’Union Européenne

Ce cours consiste en une formation consacrée à l’Union européenne à partir d’une approche renouvelée des « questions européennes ».
De manière largement dominante, les questions européennes sont en effet traitées à partir d’une approche juridique essentiellement basée sur l’analyse des traités communautaires, ainsi qu’à partir d’une approche institutionnelle qui se borne à examiner et détailler les pouvoirs (organes) européens et leurs actions (fonctions). Il s’agit dans les deux cas d’une approche très théorique qui ne permet pas toujours d’accéder aux réalités politiques et pratiques de l’Union européenne, et notamment à l’imbrication étroite entre niveau communautaire et niveau national.
La formation proposée dans le cadre de ce séminaire souhaite offrir une compréhension renouvelée de la nature et du fonctionnement concret de l’Union européenne en fournissant des éléments de problématiques structurants permettant des clés d’entrée possibles pour une analyse dynamique, et dans la mesure du possible pratique, des relations de pouvoir entre les institutions communautaires mais aussi entre les Etats membres de l’UE, sur les plans historique, géopolitique, politique, institutionnel économique et international ;
Développée sur la base de 9 séances de 2 heures, l’approche retenue conduit nécessairement à identifier les principaux enjeux, via les interventions du responsable du cours et celles d’intervenants extérieurs, l’ensemble étant complété par des questions/réponses avec les étudiants et la consultation des références bibliographiques qui seront fournies.
Cette approche s’appliquera à quatre dimensions incontournables pour appréhender les « enjeux européens », dimensions qui structureront le cours autour de 4 volets :
1) Un volet historique et géopolitique ;
2) Un volet politico-institutionnel ;
3) Un volet économico-financier ;
4) Un volet externe.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC représente de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); Examen final représente de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : T. Chopin | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Foreign Policy Analysis

This course aims to familiarize students with the process by which foreign policy is made. In exploring this question, the course takes students on a tour through the corpus of thought on foreign policy. Broadly speaking, the course covers a few main areas. The first is a systemic level of analysis, where we examine constraints on foreign-policy making such as balance of power considerations and alliance structures, in light of the wider IR field. We then move to the state level to investigate the influence of domestic factors, including the tools of foreign policy, the role of institutions, regime type, government veto players, bureaucratic and organizational politics, sub-state and social interest groups, public opinion and media, as well as cultural factors. We also cover individual-level factors that influence foreign policy decision-making, including cognitive maps, leadership traits, psychological factors, perceptions, and beliefs. Finally, we look at a few specific cases of foreign policy, onto which we apply the notions acquired previously and in light of which we discuss the existing theory of foreign policy analysis. Rather than offering a definitive answer to the question of how foreign policy is made, students will be encouraged to consider a number of possible sources and interactions among these sources.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : G. Prelz Oltramonti | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Global Governance and the UN System

Course objectives : Explain what global governance is and how it has evolved between 1945 and today ; Appreciate the complexity of global governance ; Understand the role of the UN and other global and regional organisations and institutions ; Explore specific issues of global governance such as peace operations, humanitarian interventions, health, etc. ; Map some of the challenges of contemporary global governance.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC représente de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); Examen final représente de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale OU examen final représente 100 % de la note | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : G. Prelz Oltramonti | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


Global History

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC représente de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); Examen final représente de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : V. Fernandez | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


Histoire des idées politiques anciennes et modernes

Le cours est une introduction à l’histoire des idées politiques anciennes et modernes de Platon à Marx. Le cours vise à donner un exposé non-exhaustif des courants, doctrines, idéologies et philosophies politiques dans leur contexte historique. Ce cours demande à l’étudant-e de pratiquer la méthode de la dissertation, la lecture de textes classiques, la maîtrise des contextes historiques et des idées, concepts et arguments centraux. Le cours magistral est articulé avec des travaux dirigés pour accompagner au mieux les étudiant-e-s à la maîtrise de la dissertation et du contenu du cours.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : B. Bourcier | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Histoire des idées politiques contemporaines

Ce cours se veut une introduction aux grandes idées politiques contemporaines. Notre étude portera à la fois sur des courants de pensée ou « mouvements » (nationalisme, populisme, etc), des approches philosophiques (théorie critique, égalitarisme, etc) ainsi que des auteurs (Rawls, Foucault, etc).
Les objectifs spécifiques du cours sont les trois suivants :
• Approfondir l’étude de figures et moments clés de l’histoire récente de la pensée politique;
• Évaluer de manière critique les principales théories philosophiques portant sur l’organisation de la vie politique, la démocratie, la justice sociale, le pouvoir, l’identité, etc.
• Mettre en perspective les grandes problématiques sociales, morales, politiques, juridiques et économiques de notre époque par le biais d’une étude approfondie des grandes philosophies politiques contemporaines. Examiner les façons dont les idées, théories, thèmes et arguments de philosophes contemporains viennent à la fois façonner et refléter les débats contemporains.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); examen terminal de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : P.-Y. Néron | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


History of the 20th Century

The course offers a general overview of the political, economic, social and cultural processes that have characterized the last century. From a temporal perspective, the course approaches the period following Eric Hobsbawm’s notion of the “short 20th century” as comprised by the beginning of World War I in 1914 and the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991. From a spatial perspective, the course aims to give a global and wide overview of historical developments that goes beyond the Euro-Atlantic space, including developments in Africa, Latin America and Asia. The contents are divided in five (5) units, going from the outbreak of WW1 until the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The content of each session will provide students with basic knowledge and concepts to understand the political, economic, social and cultural developments of the period, as well as a number of bibliographical references that they will be able to draw from in the development of their future career.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : A. Cosovschi | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


History, Geography, and Globalization

What is globalization and what are the implications of such a concept for research in the field of humanities? In this course, we will question the concept of globalization in some of its cultural, historical and geographical impacts in order to bring forward the general reshaping of our former conceptions of the world in terms of space (geography), History and representation of the ‘Other’ (in terms of alterity). Thus, this course aims at providing a general overview as well as a critical approach of the various theories related to, and derived from, the concept of globalization in the fields of History and Civilization, Geography and Social Sciences, and their influence on the shaping of state policies of global reach.
In order to shed a new light on the old debate about the East and the West, commonly referred to as Orient and Occident, we will question Eurocentric preconceived ideas and misconceptions and we will probe into issues related to the rise of Cultural Studies in a postcolonial world, the construction of the myth of the Occident and the supposed ‘clash of civilizations’, the controversial issues of Orientalism and its opposite Occidentalism, democracy, human rights and the rise of Asian values, the development of South/South relations, etc.
The recalling of these numerous theories should lead us to a further analysis of a major shift in our representations of the world and of the ‘Other’ that has already started reshaping state policies and global governance, redefining what was once considered a unique and universal movement towards progress.
The course will also briefly recall (as a case study) the specific historical links between the Indian subcontinent, the western coasts of South-East Asia and the eastern coast of Africa, so as to show the interconnectedness of cultures around the Indian Ocean.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : I. Sankey | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


 

International Political Economy

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Greco | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


International Political Sociology

This course provides an introduction to International Political Sociology (IPS). Critical of conventional international relations which often yields to essentialist readings of actors, logics of action and more generally of “explanations” framed as a play between abstract forces which neglect questions of human agency, IPS scholars probe alternative ways of thinking about the international. This has broadened new research avenues, such as the uncovering of new actors in the international (street level bureaucrats, the tourist, private security experts), new logics of action such as everyday practices, recognition or stigma management, and new methodological strategies so as not to start with a given framework but to observe what actors do to uncover in a more inductive manner so-called structures which shape actions without determining them. This course will explore these themes with respect to key IPS scholarship.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Fine | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Introduction à l’économie

L’objectif de ce cours de 18 heures est d’initier les étudiants à la science économique. Plus précisément, il s’agit pour les étudiants de comprendre dans le cadre d’une économie mixte de marché le rôle et les fonctions des acteurs de l’économie, et de saisir les questions de leurs interactions et de leur coordination.
Le cours est organisé en cinq chapitres. Après un chapitre introductif rappelant les définitions et méthodes de la science économique, nous aborderons rapidement l’histoire de cette science. À partir de la définition des systèmes économiques, nous aborderons les différentes manières d’étudier une économie mixte de marché. Les deux chapitres suivants traitent d’une part des consommateurs et d’autre part des entreprises : c’est-à-dire comment ces deux acteurs déterminent leurs choix économiques. Le chapitre consacré aux marchés nous permettra de voir comment les entreprises et les consommateurs parviennent (ou pas) à coordonner leurs activités.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : A. François/N.Clément | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Introduction à la science politique

Ce cours est le premier contact direct des étudiants de première année avec la Science Politique. Il a donc pour objectif d’apporter les connaissances initiales permettant ensuite d’approfondir l’ensemble des domaines de la SP. L’origine du Politique, les concepts et notions clefs, les principaux débats marquants (Pouvoir/Etat, origine de l’Etat, etc.) et l’identification des acteurs principaux du politique sont au centre du cours.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : Si pas de mid-term: CC vaut pour 50 % (25 % khôlles [2 ects sur 8] + 25% note de TD); si mid-term, CC vaut pour 60 % (25 % khôlles [2 ects sur 8] + 35% à répartir entre note de TD et mid-term); Examen final représente 50 ou 40 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : A. Massart | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Introduction à la sociologie

L’objectif de ce cours est de proposer une introduction à la sociologie et de permettre aux étudiants de se familiariser avec l’approche sociologique du monde et du social.
Ainsi, seront présentés les grands sociologues classiques et les concepts/théories/méthodes fondateurs de la discipline. A partir du chapitre 3, une approche par thématique sera privilégiée afin de familiariser les étudiants à quelques grands thèmes de la sociologie.
A l’issue du semestre, les étudiants auront non seulement acquis des connaissances générales en la matière, mais auront surtout été confrontés à de nouvelles clés de lecture du social.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : M. Neihouser | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Introduction aux études de genre

Contenu bientôt disponible

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : O. Soybakis | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Introduction aux relations internationales (1)

L’enjeu de cet enseignement est d’introduire les étudiant-e-s à l’étude des « relations internationales » et de la politique mondiale (World Politics) d’un triple point de vue : de celui, d’abord, des réalités empiriques et historiques de ce que nous en sommes venus à appeler, avec l’époque moderne, les « relations internationales » dans un usage parfois impropre du concept d’International qu’il s’agira donc d’interroger et de problématiser [1er semestre]; du point de vue ensuite des savoirs de gouvernement et de leur différenciation graduelle avec, à partir du XXème siècle, l’émergence progressive de l’International comme objet de connaissance longtemps réduit à l’étude des rapports interétatiques [2ème semestre] ; du point de vue, enfin de deux des « grands enjeux » contemporains que sont le « La violence guerrière » d’une part, « les migrations et la maîtrise des frontières », « les inégalités et le développement » [2ème semestre]. D’une manière générale, l’enseignement ambitionne de développer chez les étudiant.e.s une capacité d’analyse critique et informée historiquement susceptible de leur permettre de s’emparer, d’interroger et de comprendre les enjeux politiques contemporains sans se limiter à reproduire les commentaires et discussions les plus courants sur les « affaires internationales ».

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); examen terminal de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : Ph. Bonditti | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


Introduction aux relations internationales (2)

L’enjeu de cet enseignement est d’introduire les étudiant-e-s à l’étude des « relations internationales » et de la politique mondiale (World Politics) d’un triple point de vue : de celui, d’abord, des réalités empiriques et historiques de ce que nous en sommes venus à appeler, avec l’époque moderne, les « relations internationales » dans un usage parfois impropre du concept d’International qu’il s’agira donc d’interroger et de problématiser [1er semestre]; du point de vue ensuite des savoirs de gouvernement et de leur différenciation graduelle avec, à partir du XXème siècle, l’émergence progressive de l’International comme objet de connaissance longtemps réduit à l’étude des rapports interétatiques [2ème semestre] ; du point de vue, enfin de deux des « grands enjeux » contemporains que sont le « La violence guerrière » d’une part, « les migrations et la maîtrise des frontières », « les inégalités et le développement » [2ème semestre]. D’une manière générale, l’enseignement ambitionne de développer chez les étudiant.e.s une capacité d’analyse critique et informée historiquement susceptible de leur permettre de s’emparer, d’interroger et de comprendre les enjeux politiques contemporains sans se limiter à reproduire les commentaires et discussions les plus courants sur les « affaires internationales ».

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : Khôlle(s): 30 % la note finale (car 2 ects sur 6); Examen final représente 70 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : Ph. Bonditti | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


Introduction aux sociologies de la déviance et de la pénalité

Les objectifs du cours sont: introduire les grands concepts de la sociologie de la déviance et de la pénalité ; familiariser les étudiants avec les enjeux historiques et contemporains de la pénalité ; poursuivre l’initiation au travail scientifique la par réalisation de dossiers de recherche. Chaque séance, la première heure sera consacrée à un cours, sous la forme d’une histoire de la pensée sociologique sur les questions du crime et de la déviance. La seconde heure prendre la forme d’ateliers. Vous travaillerez, en groupe, de manière autonome, sur les différentes étapes de la réalisation d’un dossier collectif.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : J. Charbit | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Introduction to Public International Law

The course aims to provide students with a basic understanding of the logics and main principles of public international law. International law, as its name indicates, is the law that applies in the relations between (inter-) the States (-‘nation’). It is therefore not a branch of domestic law – like commercial, constitutional or yet family law – and, indeed, differs from it in many ways. Its main characteristic probably lies in the fact that the international legal order lacks a single central authority capable of ensuring universal respect for rules. It operates in a horizontal rather than vertical fashion. As a result, not only are States the main subjects of international law, but also its main guardians. This seemingly paradoxical situation is the source of most of the particularities that surround the making, the practice as well as the logics of international law. The course will seek to familiarize students with these particularities and with the content of the most important rules of international law. The purpose is to make sure that they acquire the necessary (legal) tools to critically assess and analyse how the international (legal) system works.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : CC Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); Examen final représente 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : A. Verdebout | Nombre d’heures : 24 + 16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Lecture d’œuvre: Le Léviathan (Hobbes)

Ce cours propose une lecture suivie de l’œuvre majeur du philosophe Thomas Hobbes le Léviathan (1651). On veillera tout particulièrement à expliquer l’œuvre et la pensée de Hobbes étape par étape afin que les étudiants puissent se familiariser avec la lecture d’œuvres majeures de la pensée politique. Cette lecture d’œuvre proposera notamment d’introduire les étudiants à la philosophie politique moderne anglaise et à inscrire l’œuvre dans le contexte historique et des débats philosophiques qui lui sont liés.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC (essai) | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : B. Bourcier | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Littérature et trauma

Le trauma s’est imposé depuis la fin du XXe siècle comme « nouveau langage de l’événement » selon les mots de Didier Fassin et Richard Rechtman. Si très tôt dans son histoire, le trauma psychique est un enjeu médical, juridique, voire politique, il a aujourd’hui largement débordé les espaces théoriques et pratiques d’où il est issu. Terme à l’origine spécialisé, il innerve désormais les représentations les plus courantes concernant la vie psychique des individus, l’appréhension des événements, de la mémoire et du passé sur le plan individuel et collectif. Par ailleurs, il est devenu l’objet central d’un champ de recherche interdisciplinaire qui a vu le jours dans les années 1990 aux États-Unis: les trauma studies. Des problématiques connexes (la transmission, la mémoire), des figures (la victime, le témoin), des formes (le témoignage, le récit) ou encore des motifs (la hantise) se sont alors retrouvées fortement liées au trauma. À partir d’un corpus théorique et littéraire ce cours problématisera la catégorie de trauma et en interrogera les usages, notamment en littérature, depuis la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle jusqu’à nos jours.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : A. Laumier | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Marx’s Capital

Karl Marx’s work is more often criticised than it is read. This module is based on the joint effort of reading Marx’s Capital together. Marx offered a theory that addresses capitalism as a totality and illuminates the deeply social nature of the relations that classical political economists saw as given and intrinsic to human nature. His work established a method of enquiry – historical materialism – based on a firm rejection of both idealism and crude materialism; and of evolutionary analyses of historical change. Without having read Marx’s original work, it is rather easy to misinterpret or caricaturise concepts – such as alienation, or fetishism – that originated from Marx’s thinking and misunderstand them because of the layers of derivate meanings thrust upon them in more than a century of interpretations and vulgarisations. Because of this, our effort will be that of reading the original texts together, discuss it and examine it in class, rather than reading secondary literature (Marxist, neo-Marxist and post-Marxist literature). By the end of the course students should have achieved:
• Familiarity with Marx’s language and the ability to interpret it
• Competence in Marx’s theoretical approach
• The ability to distinguish and explain the relations among central concepts encountered in Marx’s work, such as use/exchange value, labour theory of value, surplus value; fetishism; exploitation; tendency of the rate of profit to fall; the general law of capitalist accumulation; primitive accumulation; relations of production and forces of production; social reproduction; class.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Greco | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Méthodologie du travail intellectuel et bases de l’argumentation

Le but de ce cours est de familiariser les étudiants de première année avec l’environnement universitaire et de leur offrir une boite à outils (moyens, techniques, parfois simplement l’état d’esprit) leur permettant de faciliter leur apprentissage, de rendre leurs recherches plus efficaces ou encore d’améliorer leurs productions intellectuelles.
Cet enseignement est complété par deux modules :
– Visite de la bibliothèque universitaire Vauban (à accomplir par chaque étudiant dès que possible dans le semestre)
– Intervention, lors du cours, des professionnels de santé du Centre Polyvalent de Santé Universitaire (CPSU).

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC (DS lors de la 3ème séance) | Ce cours est enseigné en : L1 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : F. Briatte + C. Kelbel | Nombre d’heures : 16 | Crédit ECTS : 1


Model United Nations Course

This course’s objectives are to introduce students to negotiations within the organs of the United Nations (UN) and give them the necessary knowledge and skillset to take part in a Model United Nations (MUN) as a delegate. This course is designed to acquaint students with the operations of the United Nations through the study of political positions of member states on key issues for world politics. Students will gain insight into the history, structures and influence of the United Nations. Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills through practical tasks such as drafting a resolution, writing a position paper and public speaking. They will also learn fruitful ways of working with other delegates particularly in negotiating the content of a resolution and seeking compromises.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Fine | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Model United Nations Course (NB: only if not attended in L2)

Contenu bientôt disponible

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Fine | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Music and Politics

This course examines the complex relations between music and politics. This an exercise in political theory/philosophy, an attempt to see how political theorists/philosophers can think seriously about music. What kind of political object is music? How can music be genuinely political? Is there a specific relation between music and liberal-democratic ideals? What are the implications of the rise of a “cultural industry” for music? Is the distinction between elitist and popular forms of music still politically relevant? Can music be a source of political transformations? Is Beyoncé politically relevant and if so, how? When music should be political? When should it be apolitical?
Theme covered will included: the relevance of protest songs; music and identity politics: the politics of punk; rap and the politics of race; cultural industry and mass culture; contestation, cooptation and authenticity; art and political engagement.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : P.-Y. Néron | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Négociation diplomatique et identité(s)

La guerre et la négociation diplomatique sont deux moyens distincts de résolution d’un différend. Elles ne surviennent au demeurant pas dans le même contexte relationnel, social et historique. Si l’étude du contexte dans lequel la guerre survient fait l’objet d’une abondante littérature, celle du contexte dans lequel la négociation est choisie pour résoudre un conflit est plus rare. Le but de ce cours est de donner aux étudiant·e·s des pistes analytiques pour comprendre ce contexte, mais aussi le contexte dans lequel la négociation peut être rejetée car considérée comme impossible ou inenvisageable. Ce contexte sera particulièrement caractérisé par les représentations dont font l’objet la négociation, l’objet du conflit, les parties prenantes, leur position sur la scène internationale, etc. Nous explorerons l’ensemble de ces pistes analytiques à travers le cas de la politique des États-Unis en matière de négociation à l’égard de la Corée et de l’Iran, face à leurs programmes nucléaires respectifs. Le cours inclut une dimension théorique, en particulier relative à l’approche constructiviste, et une dimension empirique relative au cas choisi et à ses différentes caractéristiques (identité américaine, enjeux du nucléaire, conception de la négociation…). Une dimension méthodologique sera également travaillée.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : P. Ségard | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Néolibéralisme et société de l’évaluation (sous réserve d’effectifs suffisants)

La jeune protagoniste d’un épisode de la très célèbre série Black Mirror – qui projette dans des scénarios dystopiques les côtés sombres et menaçants des innovations technologiques – vit dans un monde où chaque individu évalue l’autre, ainsi que toute interaction sociale, à travers son smartphone. De cet incessant jeu d’appréciations croisées, émerge une note personnelle, calculée en temps réel par un algorithme, de laquelle dépend la position de l’individu dans la hiérarchie sociale. L’épisode, mettant en scène les effets catastrophiques d’un effondrement soudain de la popularité de la protagoniste, s’intitule justement « chute libre ». En partant d’un scénario fictionnel comme celui-ci, mais aussi de phénomènes d’actualité comme la construction du « Social Credit System » par le gouvernement chinois, ou l’utilisation des données personnelles afin d’évaluer la fiabilité et la réputation des individus ainsi que de formuler des analyses prédictives de leurs comportements, ce cours cherchera à réfléchir aux enjeux sociaux et politiques de la généralisation des pratiques d’évaluation dans nos sociétés. Dans un premier temps, nous nous concentrerons sur l’évaluation en tant que technologie politique de « gouvernement indirect » (ou de « gouvernement environnemental »), propre à la gouvernementalité néolibérale. Nous nous appuierons surtout sur les analyses politiques, sociologiques et philosophiques mettant en relation la problématique de l’évaluation avec celle de l’intervention de l’Etat dans les domaines de l’économie et de la société civile, ainsi qu’avec celle de la financiarisation de l’économie. Dans un deuxième temps, nous discuterons les effets d’individualisation (ou de subjectivation individuelle) engendrés par les pratiques d’évaluation : nous essayerons notamment d’envisager les pratiques de production de soi à travers la mesure de sa propre valeur et de son « mérite », dans une mise en perspective historique qui nous conduira de l’« ascèse intramondaine » décrite par Max Weber et des « techniques de soi » étudiées par Michel Foucault, aux pratiques de valorisation de soi impliquées par les théories néolibérales du capital humain.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : M. Nicoli | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Political Philosophy of Migration

The course aims to introduce the students to one of the major contemporary debate in political theory. This course examines the ethical and political implications of topics in immigration such as, open borders and close borders, right to exclude, right of mobility, integration, EU migration policy, boundary problem, refugee status, hospitality, immigrant workers. The course is not an advanced course in political theory, yet, it requires a good background in political theory and history of political thought.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : B. Bourcier | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Political Science Research Methods (not open to exchange students)

This course is intended to teach you basic r​esearch design​ and show you some of the ​research methods​ available to social scientists. You will have to use such skills to write up your undergraduate dissertation. Later, you will also need those skills for your Masters dissertation. Because writing skills are highly transferable, they will also be useful in your professional life to write policy papers and country reports.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % final exam (quiz in January) | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : Collectif – coordination: F. Briatte | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Politics of Development

This introductory course in development studies is tailored for students of international relations and political science as a broad overview, with the addition of a few selected themes. It offers the theoretical tools to understand the politics of development. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of distinguishing the difference between immanent and intentional development and detecting the divergences between theories and practices of development. At the end of the course, students will have acquired the theoretical foundations to discuss the main issues in development studies.
This is a pluralist module, which discusses and compares different theoretical approaches within development studies with a focus on politics, as distinct from policies. While it includes reading suggestions on development practice, the course is not practice-oriented nor is policy-oriented. It focuses on the politics of development, examining the colonial origins of development theories and their contemporary implications.
The course is structured in two parts. In Part I, we critically discuss the concept of development and its relation to colonialism. The institutionalisation of development as an ideology during the Bretton Woods period and theories of development – economic nationalism – are analysed to explain the methodological nationalism that has marked development studies until very recently. The lost decade of the 1980s is introduced through an analysis of Structural Adjustment Programmes. This historically grounded analysis of the politics of development as they unfolded from the Bretton Woods era onwards offers the foundation for a thematic discussion. In Part II, we reflect on specific themes – development aid and debt; food aid and famines; class and inequality; extractives and development; agriculture and development – that are central to the current conjuncture in development politics.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Greco | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Politics of International Law

International law and politics maintain a complicated relation. Political science sometimes looks down on international law, seeing it as a utopia disconnected from the realities of international relations and incapable of influencing (let alone constraining) the behaviour of States. International law, for its part, tends to deprecate politics, depicting it as a disorganising and destabilising rather than ordering force of international relations. The objective of this course is to investigate this complicated relationship. We will see how political scientists have started to take international law seriously has an object of study and as an integral element of international politics, but also how international lawyers have integrated the political (realist) critique of international law. Analysing international law as a socio-political phenomenon does not, however, necessarily lead to the conclusion that law is irrelevant. In examining and illustrating how the law the product of power struggles, these interdisciplinary inquiries, on the contrary, suggest that law is a paramount tool of international politics. Still, this does not mean that international is completely handmaiden to power. It can also be an instrument of political resistance and a vector for social change.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : A. Verdebout | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Politics of the Anthropocene

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : B. Coolsaet | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Politique et religion

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : J. Baudouin | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Postcolonial Studies

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : G. Bayle | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


 

Power and Ethnicity in Latin America

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : D. Gomes | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Qu’est-ce que le cosmopolitisme?

Ce cours est une introduction au cosmopolitisme. Le cosmopolitisme est souvent compris à partir de l’idée ancienne de « citoyen du monde » qui propose de penser les obligations morales et politiques des hommes à partir de leur commune appartenance au monde. Les questions majeures qui traversent la tradition cosmopolitique ont connu des développements nombreux depuis les philosophes anciens et modernes jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Dans ce cours, nous étudierons plusieurs de ces questions: la citoyenneté mondiale est-elle désirable? avons-nous des devoirs moraux globaux? La démocratie mondaile est-elle une forme de cosmopolitisme politique? Le cosmopolitisme est-il un anti-patriotisme? La justice cosmopolitique est-elle opposée au système international des Etats? Le cosmopolitisme a-t-il transformé les méthodes et objets de la sociologie et de l’anthropologie?

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : B. Bourcier | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Regional Integration in Africa

Regional integration in Africa started with a political dream and took shape through projects aimed at ensuring shared prosperity. The dream, that of pan-africanism, was the topic of a groundbreaking international gathering, the first Pan-African Conference in 1900. One of the key participants to that conference, W.E.B. Du Bois, lived to see the dream of African unity evolve into a fully-fledged institution, the Organization of African Unity in 1963.
Regional integration is both political, a tool to institutionalize continental unity, and economic, where countries seek to maximize their interests through increased trade.
Key questions we will ask throughout this course include: Why and under what conditions do states decide to transfer political authority to regional organizations? To what extent are African citizens able to take part in regional integration projects? To what extent have regional integration projects managed to increase self-reliance or reduced poverty on the continent?

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Tevoedjre | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Security, Risk, and Uncertainty

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : J. Burton | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Sociologie de l’ethnicité

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : E. Jovelin | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Sports and Politics

It has often been said that “sports and politics do not mix”. This course challenges this view, and will show that politics has a great impact on sports – and that in turn sports has an influence on politics. The course is divided into three sections. To begin with, it will introduce various relevant ideas about the definitions of sport, the history of sport and theoretical approaches to the study of sport and politics. The second section looks at sport from the perspective of various forms of identity politics, including nationalism, gender issues and ethnic issues. The third section looks at the organisational dimension, including national sports policy, the role of sport in ‘soft power’ diplomacy and international relations, and the politics of international sports organisations such as FIFA or the International Olympic Committee.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : M. Holmes | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


State Making in International Politics

The system of sovereign states is the basic starting point for thinking about, and acting within, international relations. As such, the many states constituting ‘the international’ are usually taken for granted, and the focus of researchers and practitioners lies on politics within and between states. But where do states come from in the first place and how do new states emerge today? Rather than being an evident starting point, the creation of states turns out to be a controversial subject which also sheds light on the political constitution of ‘the international’ itself as a system of states. The course introduces students to basic tenets of the study of state making in international politics and law, from early state formation through the demise of colonial empires and struggles for national self-determination to contested cases of state creation today.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : J. Grzybowski | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


The Communist Century

The course aims to give students a general view into the history of Eastern Europe during the period that goes from the Russian revolution of 1917 until the fall Soviet socialism in 1991. The course offers students the possibility to generally familiarize with the history of Eastern European countries during the 20th century, not only underscoring the importance of the Soviet Union, but also discussing Communist times in Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Yugoslavia. During the nine (9) sessions of the course, students will have the chance to go deeper in the study of Eastern European history than what is typically possible in the framework of a general history course. As for the main contents, we will discuss a number of key issues, among others: the Russian revolution , the nature of Stalinist violence in the Soviet Union, women’s position in socialist societies, what was everyday life like in socialist countries, the crisis of socialist systems in the 1980s and finally, the fall of socialism and transition to democracy and market economy in Eastern Europe.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : A. Cosovschi | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


The Role of the UN in Peacekeeping

The United Nations (UN) aims at fostering a synergy between peace, democracy and development on the five continents. The challenges are, obviously, enormous. In the past 30 years, civil conflicts and wars have had an increasingly devastating impact on community life and development throughout the world. Not only do these conflicts tend to last longer, they also have become more complex, involving both states and non-state actors. Consequently, peacekeeping and reconstruction operations have become central to the UN agenda and regional stability.
How does the UN, the only truly global organization, deal with armed conflicts which today occur more frequently within states than between member countries? As we study the challenges of building and keeping the peace in a turbulent, changing global order, we will try to understand how and why the UN has turned progressively towards prevention and post-conflict reconstruction, re-establishing the rule of law and strengthening state capacity.

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : E. Tevoedjre | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Théories de la démocratie

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Français | Enseignant : J. Baudouin | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


Theories of European Integration

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : CC représente de 25 % à 50 % de la note finale (DS/DM ou oral); Examen final représente de 75 % à 50 % de la note finale | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : C. Majastre | Nombre d’heures : 24 | Crédit ECTS : 4


Theories of International Relations

The course introduces students to theorizing about international politics in the academic (sub-) discipline of International Relations (IR). While both practices of ‘international relations’ and the conscious reflection about them ‘in theory’ are much older, IR as a separate academic field of knowledge has been formally institutionalized only in the interwar period, spreading and gaining further traction after 1945. Ever since, the discipline has struggled over its historical origins, its subject matter, and the stakes and dynamics of international politics. The course presents major theories of IR by revisiting the shifting fault lines of the discipline by tracing major schools and disputes from realism, liberalism, and Marxism to critical theory, constructivism, feminism, and postcolonialism. In so doing, it explores a variety of topics in international politics, including great power competition, war, and deterrence, cooperation, international organizations, and democratic peace, the making of friends and enemies, and the mechanisms of marginalizing and misrepresenting ‘others’. The course also highlights how theories of IR do not simply reflect actual ‘practices’ of international politics, but actually form and enable particular practices, rather than others, by shaping what seems necessary, possible, and desirable ‘in theory’.

Type de cours : Cours magistral accompagné de TDs | Modalités d’évaluation : Min. 30 % [TDs = 2 ects/6] (CC représente 30 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term/uniquement note de TD, entre 50 et 60 % si note de TD + mid-term); 70 % de la note finale si pas de mid-term; 50 ou 40 % si mid-term | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : J. Grzybowski | Nombre d’heures : 24+16 | Crédit ECTS : 4 (CM) + 2 (TDs)


Una historia comparada de la Península Ibérica, siglos XX y XXI: repúblicas, fascismos, Europa (sous réserve d’effectifs suffisants)

Contenu en attente

Type de cours : Cours magistral/séminaire (électif) | Modalités d’évaluation : 100 % CC | Ce cours est enseigné en : L3 | Langue d’enseignement : Spanish
| Enseignant : D. Gomes | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


War, Conflict, and Violence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to war and conflict studies, using the conceptual tools of critical war studies. Students will learn about the ways in which western military powers have waged war and rationalized it. This course takes a critical genealogical approach to knowledge and discourses about war. As such, it endeavours to show how those contemporary sets of knowledge and discourses have been constructed throughout history.
In a first part, the course shows how western power have rationalised war as a logical course of action and a purposeful activity. It addresses the topics of the birth of modern warfare and modern strategy, the development of airpower doctrine or nuclear deterrence doctrine and the ways in which military technologies are being developed and acquired.
In a second part, the course studies how western powers have dealt military with issues arising in the rest of the world throughout contemporary history. It addresses the topics of non-state violence, military intervention, counterinsurgency doctrine and its colonial heritage and remote warfare.

Type de cours : Cours magistral | Modalités d’évaluation : CC max. 40 %; Examen final min. 60 % | Ce cours est enseigné en : L2 | Langue d’enseignement : Anglais | Enseignant : S. Longuet | Nombre d’heures : 18 | Crédit ECTS : 3


X